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Ishidoro Japanese Stone Lanterns - A glance into the origins

Japanese Stone Lanterns or Ishidoro were first used in Japan around the 6th century AD. This would have been somewhere in the Asuka Period which saw not only artistic changes but also social and political changes in Japan caused in part by the introduction of Buddhism. The early stone lanterns in Japan were often used in shrines and temples as a kind of votive light. In a way equivalent to the votive candles used by the Church these days. These early sacred lights were said to represent Buddha in the flame that they had burning in them, and in fact, the early stone lanterns were often windowless artifacts. Of course, later the Ishidoro became used for general lighting in gardens, homes and tea houses, but their origin lies firmly in the spiritual pursuits.

Snow Piling Up On Stone Lanterns

Stone Lanterns make some of the most unusual and beautiful garden ornaments. Steeped in a rich history, Japanese stone lanterns are both functional and beautiful and full of the charm and allure of the orient. Some of the most beautiful scenes of Japanese Stone Lanterns must be during winter time when the snow piles up high on top of the lantern. The Yukimi or Snow Viewing Lantern is especially designed for this with its wide roof over the light compartment. Sometimes the roof can be up to two meters across, and made very simply or created with intricate lattice work on them. The functional aspects of the large roof are obvious - to keep the snow from extinguishing the light, but the snow viewing lanterns have become more than that, and are often designed with the intention of collecting snow on top of them so that, in a way, the art and beauty of the lantern is even more complete when snow gently settles on top.

Steampunk house

More steampunk for you - this is Robert Bruno’s house that he started building in 1974. I’m not sure what it would be like to live in, especially if it rained, but it looks cool. 33 is a good age to be ;)

Bygone-era

I love this steampunk laptop - kind of straight out of Myst and what computers would look like if they were made in a bygone era. awesome! I’m going to call this a carryable computational engine ‘cause I like the sound of that and it makes me feel all steampunk cool and stuff.

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